• Children under 5 years old need to learn what traffic is, that it can be dangerous, and simple ways of keeping safe, like holding hands
  • 1901 people were killed on GB roads in 2011
  • One of the best ways for children to be safer is for adults to set a good example when using the roads, on foot or in the car
  • The road environment is essential for children’s freedom, development and fitness but roads need to be treated with respect
  • 23,122 people were seriously injured on GB roads in 2011
  • 5 people every day are killed on GB roads
  • Primary school age is the best time for children to learn about using the roads safely, ready for more independent travel when they go up to secondary school
  • Most children under 9 years old are unable to judge how fast vehicles are going or how far away they are
  • LGVs were involved in 12,238 accidents in 2011, resulting in 191 deaths and 1,681 serious injuries
  • The risk of children being involved in a road accident rises when they start secondary school
  • The largest number of pedestrians who are hurt on the roads are between 11 and 15 years of age
  • HGVs were involved in 6,709 accidents in 2011, resulting in 259 deaths and 1,077 serious injuries
  • Secondary school children are likely to take greater risks without thinking about the potential consequences. Teenagers need to be taught how to assess these risks and make informed choices when using the road environment
  • Children are more likely to die in a road collision than from any other accidental cause – but let’s not focus on the negative – you can help!
  • Between ¼ and 1/3 of all road deaths and serious injuries involve people driving for work
  • In 2011 nearly 20% of all car occupants killed or seriously injured were 17-24 years old - when they start driving lessons a good road safety understanding will be invaluable
  • Every day of the year more than 150 vehicles driven on company business crash

srsCULTUREforYoungDrivers

There is nothing wrong with the love of driving or riding - even at speed - if it is in the right environment.

srsCULTURE encourages a responsible attitude to car and bike ownership, respect for other road users and, the aspiration to become a good and safe driver/rider for life.

Young people have the potential to be the best drivers/riders on our roads. Yet they are disproportionately represented in casualty statistics. The two main reasons for this are generally deemed to be their inexperience and attitude.

Although road safety is something all young drivers/riders should take seriously, it’s not seen as being very ‘cool’.

The srsCULTURE programme, throughout the 'forSchool’ phases, concentrates on the road environment and learning about how to share it safely, in order to develop a much healthier attitude, respect and responsibility toward other road users.

The ‘forYoungDriver/rider’ sector continues with this theme. It provides young people with sensible advice and a sound understanding of issues related to driving or riding and owning a vehicle. This helps to reduce the likelihood of inadvertently breaking the law, or being unsafe (often due to a lack of understanding of the reasoning behind ‘road rules’). Furthermore this encourages them to become responsible vehicle owners and safe road-users.

Because the topics are very relevant to them and are not all about ‘DON’T DO THIS!’, students are much more likely to engage with the programme.

srsCULTUREforYoungDrivers complements any practical training undertaken by the students, with qualified instructors. By developing a good attitude as well as providing sound knowledge and understanding of driving-related issues, it aims to assist young people to achieve their full potential and become some of the best drivers/riders on our roads.

Try to be involved in the purchase of your child’s first car or moped/motorcycle – this is likely to be the biggest expenditure they have ever made and they will be inexperienced in making important choices and knowing their rights. Sound systems and alloy wheels may seem essential to them, but they do not contribute to road safety. ABS, ESC and airbags are features which have been proved to reduce injury severity. Encourage them to choose safety over looks!

Persuade your young adult to take further driver training – Pass Plus/Pass Plus Cymru (as soon after passing their test as possible). Advanced driver training will help them to become safer and wiser road users. (This can lead to a discount on their insurance and improve their employment prospects.)

Discuss with them, the responsibility that they have to their passengers and everyone’s families.

Talk about the risks of taking alcohol or drugs before driving and also the need to ensure that all their passengers are wearing seat-belts. By the same token discourage them from giving lifts to friends who may be the ‘worse for wear’ due to alcohol or drugs and whose behaviour is likely to distract a novice driver.

If you are concerned about the general driving of any of their friends (or anyone else) with whom they may take lifts, say so! Challenge the issues. By getting involved before a crash happens you may help prevent a tragedy.

Remember

There is nothing wrong with the love of driving or riding - even at speed - if it is in the right environment (eg on a race-track).

srsCULTURE encourages a responsible attitude to car and bike ownership, respect for other road users and, the aspiration to become a good and safe driver/rider for life.

Young people have the potential to be the best drivers/riders on our roads. Yet they are disproportionately represented in casualty statistics. The two main reasons for this are generally deemed to be their inexperience and attitude.

Although road safety is something all young drivers/riders should take seriously, it’s not seen as being very ‘cool’.

Guide for young drivers