• Children under 5 years old need to learn what traffic is, that it can be dangerous, and simple ways of keeping safe, like holding hands
  • 1901 people were killed on GB roads in 2011
  • One of the best ways for children to be safer is for adults to set a good example when using the roads, on foot or in the car
  • The road environment is essential for children’s freedom, development and fitness but roads need to be treated with respect
  • 23,122 people were seriously injured on GB roads in 2011
  • 5 people every day are killed on GB roads
  • Primary school age is the best time for children to learn about using the roads safely, ready for more independent travel when they go up to secondary school
  • Most children under 9 years old are unable to judge how fast vehicles are going or how far away they are
  • LGVs were involved in 12,238 accidents in 2011, resulting in 191 deaths and 1,681 serious injuries
  • The risk of children being involved in a road accident rises when they start secondary school
  • The largest number of pedestrians who are hurt on the roads are between 11 and 15 years of age
  • HGVs were involved in 6,709 accidents in 2011, resulting in 259 deaths and 1,077 serious injuries
  • Secondary school children are likely to take greater risks without thinking about the potential consequences. Teenagers need to be taught how to assess these risks and make informed choices when using the road environment
  • Children are more likely to die in a road collision than from any other accidental cause – but let’s not focus on the negative – you can help!
  • Between ¼ and 1/3 of all road deaths and serious injuries involve people driving for work
  • In 2011 nearly 20% of all car occupants killed or seriously injured were 17-24 years old - when they start driving lessons a good road safety understanding will be invaluable
  • Every day of the year more than 150 vehicles driven on company business crash

srsCULTUREforPedestrians

Top Tips for Pedestrians

  • Where possible, avoid walking in the carriageway, but when you have to, always walk facing towards oncoming traffic where there is no footway – in the UK this means on the right hand side of the road. In this way you can make eye contact, ensure the driver has seen you and be prepared to jump out of the way, if he hasn’t.
  • When crossing, even on a controlled pedestrian crossing, always assume that the driver is not going to stop – you may well have priority, but it’s no good arguing that from your hospital bed (or worse).
  • On blind bends, it may be advisable to cross to the opposite side, at a safe point - (even if it might require briefly retracing one’s steps), but be alert to traffic approaching from behind - return to the correct side as soon as it is safe to do so.
  • Walking in groups, be prepared to form a single file and face the oncoming traffic - stop talking in hazardous situations and give 100% attention to the task in hand.
  • When walking in groups, approaching a blind bend, it may be advisable for ‘the leader’ to cross and act as ‘lookout’ - from a point mid-way round the bend, enabling the group to continue on the right side of the road. In large groups (walking buses), consider the use of a whistle to alert walkers to approaching traffic.
  • At night always wear something light (preferably reflective) – This can be sensible even in the daylight when walking in shaded areas. (If you are a driver, you will be aware how difficult it is to see someone in dark clothing.)
  • Keep children and animals under tight control even on footways - make sure the child is on your inside (farthest from the traffic) or in front of you at all times. If you have more than one child, make the children walk in single file and you walk nearest the traffic, preferably with reflective clothing.
  • Never wear headphones when walking in the carriageway and be very careful when using a mobile phone (preferably stop in a safe place to complete a call) – we need all our senses to be alert to approaching traffic.
  • Listen for oncoming traffic - and try to identify a safe refuge to wait for a vehicle to pass.
  • When in charge of a wheelchair/pushchair, remember it may not go quite where you want it to go - Don’t be afraid to seek help from others if necessary.
  • Be extra careful walking anywhere after consuming alcohol - you may be unsteady on your feet and your senses will be dulled.
  • In shopping areas, be alert to drivers driving at inappropriate speed and nowadays be alert to ‘silent’ electric cars.
  • REMEMBER YOU ARE EXTREMELY VULNERABLE ALWAYS EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED.